How To: Use the vocative form in biblical Greek

In this language tutorial, you will learn how to use the vocative case in biblical Greek (Koine). The vocative case is the case used for a noun identifying the oblect being addressed. This is a perfect lesson for those who wish to study this ancient language. Listen and repeat the words in this language tutorial and you will be speaking biblical Greek in no time.

How To: Say 'what is your name' and 'my name is' in French

Meeting new people can be hard for some people, especially if they're using a different language, like French. This video will teach you how to say "what is your name" and "my name is" in French. To ask someone their name, a stranger or someone older than you, ask, "Comment vous appelez-vous?". When asking someone your own age, it's "Comment tu t'appelles?" To answer, say "Je m'appelle" + Your Name. Example: "Je m'appelle David."

How To: Use "live" as a verb & adjective in English

Paul, an English teacher, gives a lesson on the difference between the word "live" as a verb and as an adjective. To make to "v" sound when saying the word, the lower lip has to touch the teeth. "Live" as verb is an action, so you say "I live in Minneapolis". The singular form is "live," and the plural form is "lives". Live" as an adjective is a describing word, so you say "Live TV is fun". "Live"" as an adjective describes the subject of a sentence. "Live" as an adjective can mean something ...

How To: Count from 1 to 10 in Vietnamese

In this tutorial we learn how to say number 1 to 10 in Vietnamese. When you learn how to say this, make sure you have the accent down right or understand how to read the language. M™t = One, Hai = Two, Ba = Three, Bon = Four, Nam = Five, Sau = Six, Bay = Seven, Tam = Eight, Chin = Nine, and Muoi = Ten. Listen to the video so you can hear how to properly say each of the words. These are pretty simple and basic, so you shouldn't have any problem saying them at all. Enjoy learning this beautiful...

How To: Say "I Love You" in Cherokee

Check out this instructional language video to learn how to speak Cherokee! In this lesson, learn how to say "I Love You" (Gvgeyu) in the Eastern (Giduwa) dialect of the Cherokee language. This video utilizes a repetition tactic and visual examples to help you memorize the words. This video is great for beginners who want to improve their Cherokee language skills. Practice your Cherokee by learning how to say "I love you" to the person you love!

How To: Ask and reply to questions in English

The world of English is a fun and exciting place to be. Learn English with Mr. Duncan as he provides basic grammar instruction and speaks in basic English phrases. Check out this English language tutorial to learn how to ask and reply to questions in English. This language lesson is perfect for ESL students or anyone looking to improve their English skills. So watch this instructional English language video and practice asking and answering questions using English words.

How To: Use the English proposition "at"

This video is in the Language category where you will understand how the proposition "at" is used in English language. "At" is used to indicate either location or time. A few examples of using "at" for indicating location are; "I am at school", "You are at home", "She is at the store" and "They are at the park". To indicate exact time, the preposition "at" is used. A few examples are; "The movie starts at 6:15", "You have to be there at 1:30" and "Let's meet at noon". You can watch the video ...

How To: Say numbers 11 to 99 in Vietnamese

In this language video tutorial you will learn how to say numbers 11 to 99 in Vietnamese. For the numbers from 11 to 19, you simply add the number to the word for 10, that is, Muoi. For example, 14 will be Muoi Bon (Bon = 4) and 18 will be Muoi Tam (Tam = 8). For multiples of 10, simply add Muoi after the number. For example, 20 will be Hai Muoi (Hai = 2), 30 will be Ba Muoi (Ba =3), 40 is Bon Muoi and so on. For all other numbers, simply add the number after the multiple of 10. For example, ...

How To: Say "Who are you" & other phrases in Cherokee

Check out this instructional language video to learn to speak Cherokee! In this lesson, learn how to say the phrase "Who are you," "What is your name?" and "Good to meet you" in Cherokee. This Cherokee language lesson is in the Eastern or Giduwa dialect as spoken by elders on the Qualla. This video is great for beginners who want to improve their Cherokee language skills. Practice your Cherokee by learning how to say "Who are you" and other phrases in Cherokee!

How To: Compliment a person's cooking in Spanish

In this free video language lesson, you'll learn how to complement someone's cooking in perfect Spanish: "El comida esta delisiosa." Interested in learning Spanish but haven't got the time to take a weekly class? No problemo! The Internet is awash in free, high-quality video lessons like this one. For more information, and to get started using this phrase yourself, watch this helpful video guide for Spanish students.

How To: Say basic ordering phrases in Polish: "Menu" & "tea"

In this video, we learn how to say basic ordering phrases in Polish: "Menu" & "tea". When watching the video, you need to make sure you practice saying out the words after you hear them spoken. The words will appear on the screen as they are being said out loud. After you hear the word, practice saying it and break it down into different parts if you don't understand it at first. With this video, you will learn how to say a bunch of different things to order things while in a coffee or tea sh...

How To: Use "It's + adjective + infinitive" in English

In this video, we learn how to use "It's + adjective + infinitive" in English. To form these sentences, you will use the pattern that is stated above. This is very common in the English language, and you can put whatever you want into the sentence as the infinitive. You can change this from "it's hard to do" to It's not hard to do" to "it's easy to do". You can also make something negative, by giving it the prefix "im", which would change "possible" to "impossible". You can also ad in "un" to...

How To: Use the 'stop' verb in the English language

The verb "stop" in the English language can be used with a gerund and an infinitive. The word "stop" has different meanings depending on how it's used. Look at the sentence, "I stopped eating fast food." Stopped is used in the past tense and eating is a gerund, or a word that describes an activity and functions as a noun. Look at the sentence, "I stopped to eat some fast food." In that sentence, there is an infinitive. The first sentence means I no longer eat fast food. The second sentence me...

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