Hot Language Posts

How To: Say "Thank you" in Cherokee

Check out this instructional language video to learn to speak Cherokee. In this lesson, learn how to say "Thank you" in Cherokee. This video uses the Giduwa or Eastern dialect to say Thank you, you're welcome, and I appreciate you. This video is great for beginners who want to improve their Cherokee language skills. Practice your Cherokee by expressing your gratitude!

How To: Pronounce the letters GY, A-O, NY in Hungarian

Check out this instructional Hungarian language video to learn how to speak Hungarian! In this lesson, learn how to pronounce the letters GY, A-O, and NY in Hungarian. This video provides phrases exclusively in Hungarian without English translation or subtitles. This instructional language video is better for advanced Hungarian speakers who need to improve their pronunciation skills. Practice your Hungarian and learn how to pronounce the letters GY, A-O, and NY.

How To: Say numbers 11 to 99 in Vietnamese

In this language video tutorial you will learn how to say numbers 11 to 99 in Vietnamese. For the numbers from 11 to 19, you simply add the number to the word for 10, that is, Muoi. For example, 14 will be Muoi Bon (Bon = 4) and 18 will be Muoi Tam (Tam = 8). For multiples of 10, simply add Muoi after the number. For example, 20 will be Hai Muoi (Hai = 2), 30 will be Ba Muoi (Ba =3), 40 is Bon Muoi and so on. For all other numbers, simply add the number after the multiple of 10. For example, ...

How To: Say hello in French, German, Italian & more

In this video from TwinsEre199 we learn how to say hello in 10 different languages. It goes through each language and shows the spelling on the screen and in some cases the pronunciation as well. It is not said out loud at all but you can see each word on the screen and sound it out for yourself. The following are the languages you will learn: French is bonjour. Spanish is hola. Italian is Bon Giorno. German is Guten. Chinese is Ni Hao. Irish is Dia Duit. Hindi is Namaste. Russian is Zdravstv...

How To: Ask for something in Arabic

You are in Morocco and you know what you want, but how do you ask for it? This lesson teaches you the basics of asking for this or that, and how to be polite about it. A little Arabic can go a long way. Follow along with the language lessons in these videos and you'll be speaking Arabic in no time.

How To: Pronounce food and drinks in Thai

Check out this Thai language tutorial lesson about Thai food and eating out in Thailand. There are many delicious Thai dishes and meals, so don't miss out by just eating western food instead of Thai. This lesson includes useful phrases and words for traveling in Thailand. Make sure you know these and enjoy the Thai culture, beaches and company of Thai people. Practice your Thai language skills and learn how to pronounce food and drinks in Thai with this instructional language video!

How To: Pronounce Linus Torvalds in Swedish, Finnish & English

Linus Torvalds, creator of the Linux operating system, often raises eyebrows with a name that may not flow easily off the tongue. As a finlandsvenskar/suomenruotsalainen, or a Swedish-speaking Finn and as a sought-after international engineer, Linus is used to pronouncing his name in at least three different languages. Watch this video language tutorial and learn how to correctly say Linus Torvalds's name in his mother tongue of Swedish, his homeland's language of Finnish, and the internation...

How To: Use "It's + adjective + infinitive" in English

In this video, we learn how to use "It's + adjective + infinitive" in English. To form these sentences, you will use the pattern that is stated above. This is very common in the English language, and you can put whatever you want into the sentence as the infinitive. You can change this from "it's hard to do" to It's not hard to do" to "it's easy to do". You can also make something negative, by giving it the prefix "im", which would change "possible" to "impossible". You can also ad in "un" to...

How To: Describe situations that didn't happen in the past

This video shows us how to describe the situations that are opposite of the future perfect tense. Here it is shown how to describe the situations that did or did not happen in the past using would, have and past participle. He gives us 3 very good examples that are describing such situations. In these examples he describes a situation which happened in the past which is actually a negative and uses a fact that is described in the present tense to give the reason why that situation ended in a ...

How To: Use the antes de and despues de verbs in Spanish

In this tutorial, we learn how to speak Spanish: Antes de / despues de + verb. If you want to say "I eat breakfast before I go to school" you will say "yo desayuno antes de ir a la escuela". You will change a verb in the phrase depending on where it is placed in the sentence. If you change this same example sentence around, it will sound different in the Spanish version of the same exact sentence than the original. To express the opposite idea, you will change the end of the verb to state the...

How to Speak English: Reported speech with conditionals

In this tutorial, we learn how to speak English with conditionals. Conditional statements need special attention and usually start with the word "if". An example of a conditional statement is "if you want, we'll go out to dinner". This has two parts, a condition, and a result. The condition is expressed by "if". To report them, don't change the verbs unless you're dealing with a real condition. Look and see if verb tenses can change depending on how the sentence is structured. Try to remember...

How To: Use the 'stop' verb in the English language

The verb "stop" in the English language can be used with a gerund and an infinitive. The word "stop" has different meanings depending on how it's used. Look at the sentence, "I stopped eating fast food." Stopped is used in the past tense and eating is a gerund, or a word that describes an activity and functions as a noun. Look at the sentence, "I stopped to eat some fast food." In that sentence, there is an infinitive. The first sentence means I no longer eat fast food. The second sentence me...

How To: Use the verb "have" for eating and drinking

In this tutorial, we learn how to use the verb "have" for eating and drinking. When someone asks you what you are eating or what you did eat, you will have to use the word "have" to answer or even if you want to ask the question you have. An example of asking something a question like this would be, "what do you usually have for breakfast, lunch or dinner?" Any question with meals will have the word "have" mixed into it, because it's asking what you are going to or have eating in a different ...

How To: Use the Japanese slang "kakkoii" or "cool"

In this tutorial, we learn Japanese slang "kakkoii" or "cool". The word we will learn is "kakkoii" which describes something that is cool, looks awesome, or sounds cool. So, if you wanted to describe a band that sounds cool or say someone is cool, you would use this word. There is a small "su" in the word that you will need to learn how to pronounce when you are saying it. "Mabui" is a word that you would to describe for a girl that is really hot with a nice body and face. For the ladies, if ...

How To: Read the poem "Hope is the thing with feathers"

This video tutorial belongs to the Language category which is going to show you how to read the poem "Hope is the thing with feathers". This video is a reading of the poem is by Emily Dickinson. Here is the poem. Hope is the thing with feathers, that perches in the soul and sings the tune without the words and never stops at all and sweetest in the gale is heard. And sore must be the storm, that could abash the little bird that kept so many warm. I've heard it in the chilliest land, and on th...

How To: Tag questions with indefinite pronouns in English

This is a video tutorial in the Language category where you are going to learn how to tag questions with indefinite pronouns in English. A tag question begins as a statement and ends as a question. Here's an example with a definite pronoun: He's a student, isn't he? Indefinite pronouns are exceptions to the rule. For example, everyone's here, can be made in to a tag question. But, the pronoun, everyone, is indefinite. Hence, when you make it in to a tag question, you can't use "it". The corre...

How To: Understand English phrasal verbs & compound words

The presenter, Ms. Jennifer explains how compound words are formed from phrasal verbs. With examples she explains how the meaning and pronunciation differs when compound words are formed from phrasal verbs. She explains the difference between 'show' and 'show off' by showing her collection of fans, and showing off with one of her beautiful fan from Japan. Then she explains the difference between 'show off' and 'show-off', giving examples and makes the listeners clear about compound nouns also...